Author Topic: Any connection between foods and bone cancer?  (Read 1727 times)

Offline GoldenPyrs

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Any connection between foods and bone cancer?
« on: May 31, 2007, 09:12:52 am »
The thread today about high vs. low protein diets fed to puppies and the impact on their ortho development has reminded me of a question that I've had since we lost Halley, our 3 y/o Pyr, to bone cancer last year.  Does anyone know if there is any known connection between osteosarcoma later in life and the amount of protein in the puppy's diet?   As you can imagine whenever we have a puppy again, I want avoid anything that could increase those odds.   :( 
Marie

And my pups:
Daisy a 9 y/o Golden/Lab mix
Sammy a 6-7(?) y/o Great Pyrenees adopted 3/07
Cassie a 3 y/o Pyr/Mystery Snuggle Bunny mix adopted 2/07

My angel girls waiting at the Bridge:
Cara 1989-2001 Great Pyrenees
Sally ? - 1993 Dobie(rescued '92)
Halley 2002-2006 Great Pyrenees

Offline GoldenPyrs

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Re: Any connection between foods and bone cancer?
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2007, 10:00:36 am »
Well, I'm not sure about early years but protein is very important to dogs with cancer.  I just found this online:

The best diets for cancer patients are rich in fat and protein and low in carbohydrates.  A dog with cancer is building a lot of new tissue, and adequate proteins and cell membrane compounds (omega 3, 6 and 9 fatty acids) are required to do this. When the adequate amounts of the correct proteins and fats are not present in the diet, the body will rob it from other places, leading at best to muscle wasting, but more likely complications with the functions of the kidneys and liver. This can lead to kidney and liver failure, which is something your poor dog does not need on top of the cancer. Fortunately, these secondary liver and kidney complications can usually be avoided by watching the dog's diet.


Thank you Julie!  I'll print this off and keep it just in case (God forbid!) we should ever have another dog with cancer.  :'(  Halley (RIP sweet girl) was so young that she had wonderful blood work even the day that we had her PTS, but the cancer was in her leg and in her lungs, so we had to make that heartbreaking decision for her.  :'(  I just wonder if there is a connection to protein levels in puppy food that might cause changes in the growth plates (is that right?) or something that might increase the chances of bone cancer.  Colorado State Univ. was working on osteosarcoma research (we consulted with them & 2 other univ. vet schools about Halley), so I may check with them to see if there is any new info.  I just want to do everything possible to avoid having another dog go through this.  Unfortunately, it's all too common.  :(
Marie

And my pups:
Daisy a 9 y/o Golden/Lab mix
Sammy a 6-7(?) y/o Great Pyrenees adopted 3/07
Cassie a 3 y/o Pyr/Mystery Snuggle Bunny mix adopted 2/07

My angel girls waiting at the Bridge:
Cara 1989-2001 Great Pyrenees
Sally ? - 1993 Dobie(rescued '92)
Halley 2002-2006 Great Pyrenees