Author Topic: Hello new here  (Read 7687 times)

Offline Sadenna_And Zoo

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Hello new here
« on: February 17, 2006, 12:13:03 pm »
couple weeks a week I found this board and posted on the introduction page and gave a general description my husband I are looking for with a large or giant breed dogs. A few breeds have been suggested to us now my husband loves the Bernese Mountain dog and i was wondering how are they temperment wise we are looking for a dog that will be able to co-habitate well in our home with our pretty much a small zoo of 2 dogs Dolittle is Black Lab/Chow/Daschund mix Male thats 7 years old And Tibe is a 6 year female Lhasa Apso. We also have cats, birds, retpiles so we have been looking for a dog that if raised and socialiezed around all  these guys will do fine.  My question how energetic is the burnese mountain dog as we are looking for fairly low energy as neither of us jog, hike etc. but a dog that would be fine with several walks a day, a romp in our huge fenced back yard with some playtime we are looking for laid back couch potato that would be ok with walks, and playtime but also would like to be where we are weather it's relaxing in the evening or puttering around the back yard. My husband really loves the breed so I would love to learn more about them from those who live with this beautiful dog other than what I have read on the internet. We have the Seattle Kennel Club Dog show coming up in next month and they always have a Bernese Mountain Dog Meet the breed booth along with other several other breed booths so we plan on talking to those who are doing the the booth this year as well. Would welcome any other ideas for a breed of dog if you do not think a bernese would work in our family and home I have also been suggested a Newfoundland as well lovely dogs I also love the LeonBergers. I don't mind brushing, slobber all that is not an issue for me.  I am also home alone at night since hubby works nights so not only are we looking for a dog to be part of our family but one that can be a good watch dog and will make sure someone with not good intentions has no interest in coming up to our porch or entering our home..I don't want a guard but we are thinking size can be a good deterant as well..but mainly we just want a wondeful family member .
I am proud slave to:

Dolittle (7years old-Male):
Black Lab/Chow/Daschund Mix

Tibet:(6 years old -Female):
 Lhasa Apso

Maggie:(5 Month old Female):
  Black Lab/Rottweiler mix

Other Pets:

4 Cats
9 birds
3 Snakes
3 Lizards

Offline newflvr

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Re: Hello new here
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2006, 12:39:51 pm »
I have Newfs, but their playmates are Berners...and they ARE wonderful dogs!  They don't drool nearly as much as the Newfs and are similar in size and temperment.  My friends first Berner is mellow, laid back, sweet and LOVES to sit on feet! ;D  Her second Berner (who is now 4) is the opposite.  He's full of energy and always looking for trouble to get in to.  My friend thinks that the second one is the exception to the breed....that he is just not well bred.  I think, as with all  dogs, it pays to do lots of research in to breeders and to see the parents if at all possible so you know what you can expect from your pup.

Good luck and keep us informed with lots of pictures, 'k?

Offline sc.trojans

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Re: Hello new here
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2006, 07:20:19 pm »

The breed standard for Berners is confident, alert, good natured and never sharp or shy and aloof to strangers. My last Berner, a male, was a mellow easy going boy who was aloof to strangers. My current Berner, a young 1.5 year old female, couldn't be more different. She is extremely athletic, has a very high metabolism and requires a lot of free exercise and socialization with other dogs. She is not aloof at all.  The males are more aloof than females, and males can often be more mellow in adulthood, although there is no guarantee of this.

Berners, if from a reputable breeder and not a puppymill or backyard breeder, can be relied upon to be highly dog social and like other dogs.  The important thing to remember is there is no breed guarantee, so you must evaluate the parents and their temperaments and energy levels. Most young Berners, if healthy, are high energy until 2-3 years of age when they mature and settle down. A highly energetic young Berner will likely be a problem for small dogs but will ultimately learn not to squash them. If you are looking for mellow from the start, there are better choices to consider.

An important aspect of the Berner to understand is that they are highly touch sensitive and emotional. This is in stark contrast to breeds who are not touch sensitive at all such as Labs and GSDs.  Berners are highly sensitive and easily damaged by harsh treatment and aversive training methods. We have seen many in this breed ruined by pinch collars, harsh verbal corrections, and newspaper swatting.
SC Trojans
with Gracie and Skylar

Offline Sadenna_And Zoo

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Re: Hello new here
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2006, 05:42:07 pm »

 thats why I am posting on this message forum to see what dog would work best for our household and to let people know what we are looking for and what your home life is like..I don't know any dog that does not do well with harsh training methods..and I would definantly buy from a reputable breeder no ifs, ands or buts about that we have several clubs in our area for all different breeds of dogs and my husband and I attend the seattle Kennel Club Dog show every year we get our answers questioned but still like to hear opinions from others. And alot of reputable breeders in this area for all breeds of dogs.

I was just curious about the Bernese as my husband very much likes them and has liked what he has read about them..we tend to do our research and spend alot of time trying to learn what we can about the breeds we are interested in something we do with all animals even if we don't have that particular one..we have always done our research.

  After the attending the Seattle Kennel Club Dog show this past sunday we are still not sure what we are going to do and what breed to get, and who knows we may just wind up with your average mixed breed..that right dog will come along but in the mean time I like to learn all I can so I know weather or not a certain breed is going to be worth proceding further on such as buying.

The breed standard for Berners is confident, alert, good natured and never sharp or shy and aloof to strangers. My last Berner, a male, was a mellow easy going boy who was aloof to strangers. My current Berner, a young 1.5 year old female, couldn't be more different. She is extremely athletic, has a very high metabolism and requires a lot of free exercise and socialization with other dogs. She is not aloof at all.  The males are more aloof than females, and males can often be more mellow in adulthood, although there is no guarantee of this.

Berners, if from a reputable breeder and not a puppymill or backyard breeder, can be relied upon to be highly dog social and like other dogs.  The important thing to remember is there is no breed guarantee, so you must evaluate the parents and their temperaments and energy levels. Most young Berners, if healthy, are high energy until 2-3 years of age when they mature and settle down. A highly energetic young Berner will likely be a problem for small dogs but will ultimately learn not to squash them. If you are looking for mellow from the start, there are better choices to consider.

An important aspect of the Berner to understand is that they are highly touch sensitive and emotional. This is in stark contrast to breeds who are not touch sensitive at all such as Labs and GSDs.  Berners are highly sensitive and easily damaged by harsh treatment and aversive training methods. We have seen many in this breed ruined by pinch collars, harsh verbal corrections, and newspaper swatting.

I am proud slave to:

Dolittle (7years old-Male):
Black Lab/Chow/Daschund Mix

Tibet:(6 years old -Female):
 Lhasa Apso

Maggie:(5 Month old Female):
  Black Lab/Rottweiler mix

Other Pets:

4 Cats
9 birds
3 Snakes
3 Lizards

Offline newflvr

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Re: Hello new here
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2006, 06:08:42 pm »
Try reading "Paws to Consider" by Brian Kilcommons and Sarah Wilson and/or The Right Dog for You" by Daniel F. Tortora.  The first will tell you the pros and cons of each breed.  The book is broken down under chapter heading such as "the Nine to Five Dog", "The City Dog", and "Not for Everyone". 

The second book takes you through a series of questions and by the time you finish all of them, you end up with about five- eight dogs that could fit your lifestyle.  It's how we ended up with Newfs.  Our top choice dogs, according to this book were Scottish Deerhound, Poodle, Newf, and I can't remember the last couple.  We've never been sorry about our choice.

Good luck!! and let us know what you decide and then post lots of pics!!!

Offline Sadenna_And Zoo

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Re: Hello new here
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2006, 10:11:41 pm »
Thanks for the book suggestions I will check them out,  my husband and I are taking this really slow and not jumping into anything real soon 1 we don't know what dog would work for us and 2 we just are not ready nor have the time to work with a puppy right now, I guess you can say we are some of those rare people who actually take their time and do their research..I actually spend lot of time online reading up on care of a variety of animals from your domestic to your exotic with having the variety we have we never know what will be dumped on us next I just like to make sure I know what I need to know.

  One problem we have run into is contradicting information online and even in books one  will say one thing about a breed and another site will say the total opposite where one  starts making you feel yes thats the breed for us then you read another and are very dishearted and think well I guess not it can be very frustrating..

So far this is our list of Breeds so far

Bull Mastiff
Old English BullDog
Newfoundland
Boxer
LeonBerger


But again who knows a dog we were not looking for will come into our lives thats not even on our list that will become a very much loved member of the family. But I will definanlty post it when I we know for sure..but right now it won't be any time soon we are looking at a good year or so down the road..we want to take our time and throughly do our research.
I am proud slave to:

Dolittle (7years old-Male):
Black Lab/Chow/Daschund Mix

Tibet:(6 years old -Female):
 Lhasa Apso

Maggie:(5 Month old Female):
  Black Lab/Rottweiler mix

Other Pets:

4 Cats
9 birds
3 Snakes
3 Lizards

Gypsy Jazmine

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Re: Hello new here
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2006, 10:21:05 pm »
By your requirments in a dog you've described the Great Pyrenees to an absolute T!!!...Have you considered a Great Pyr?...My boys Samson & Pippin are the lights of my life!

Offline happiday

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Re: Hello new here
« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2006, 03:19:28 pm »
An important aspect of the Berner to understand is that they are highly touch sensitive and emotional.
Quote
Quote


Hello, I am also new here and am wondering if you could explain what 'touch sensitive' means?  Does this mean they do or do not like to be touched?  Is this a 'needy' breed?  I am trying to determine if this is the dog for my family, also.
Thanks.
Salli, Annie's mama!

lorim2

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Re: Hello new here
« Reply #8 on: December 22, 2006, 06:43:23 pm »
Hi..Just reading your post and wondering if you have considered Old English Mastiff.  I have always had Labs who we all know are wonderful but have lots of energy and require tons of exercise!  Then we brought Marley into our house.  OMG..this dog is the most incredible dog ever.  We already had a yellow lab, 2 small chichuauas, 8 snakes, a parrot, a nile monitor and a coatimundi so needless to say I was concerned mainly because of the size and we had never had an OEM.  Boy was I ever surprised!  I had no clue!  This big baby has more love in his big heart than you could imagine and he loves long slow walks, (sometimes he likes to have running fits!) but then we are in the house having our treat and then time for dinner and a movie.  The only thing that is a must!!! is to have a big enough couch for him to share with you....I love this big guy!!  Hope that helps

Offline sc.trojans

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Re: Hello new here
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2007, 02:43:14 pm »

Hello, I am also new here and am wondering if you could explain what 'touch sensitive' means?  Does this mean they do or do not like to be touched?  Is this a 'needy' breed?  I am trying to determine if this is the dog for my family, also.
Thanks.
Quote


Ahhh...very good question - I should explain.

"Touch sensitive" traditionally means that they are sensitive to how they are touched and handled.  A "touch sensitive" breed may learn to duck or develop shyness with abrupt or erratic hands grabbing them, being grabbed by the back of the neck and led, or aversive actions such as choke collars or swatting.  Sensitive breeds are easily damaged by this.

There are breeds in contrast that are not regarded as "touch sensitive" - this is broadly speaking of course, and I do not like to over generalize since dogs are individuals. But traditionally for example Labs are rarely touch sensitive - you can grab them by the neck to lead them and poke and prod and they do not get "hurt" or "offended".  I saw a young Berner get "popped" with a choke chain and cower, then slink into a corner.  That is an example of the highly visible and blatant damage that is done to this breed.

Berners require a very gentle hand - no harsh corrections or tugging or pulling.  Even my boisterous Berner is sensitive to how she is handled and I am fostering a Berner rescue right now who came to be very damaged (afraid of the car, fearful of people etc.) all because he was "manhandled" - not abused or hit mind you - just handled roughly and insensitively.

So I believe this is a major component to consider when considering a breed:  their emotional "touch sensitivity" - how active and "physical" is your home?  A lot of small children banging and tugging on animals? Abrupt and imposing adults? Not an ideal situation for a Berner.  Are you accustomed to non sensitive breeds and use strong, aversive training methods? Also not a good situation for a Berner.

Hope that clarifies.....
SC Trojans
with Gracie and Skylar

Offline Rider

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Re: Hello new here
« Reply #10 on: May 04, 2007, 11:14:59 pm »
I also have a 6 month old Bernese Mountain Dog. She is very energenic and has to always be kept busy. I had a training session with her this  week and she will be starting a 3 week training and boarding program at the end of this month.She is very happy but really keeps us on our toes! Everyone that I know that has a male they are very calm not the females I know the total opposite !! Might be something to consider when and if you get a Berner????

Offline Olliesmum

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Re: Hello new here
« Reply #11 on: May 05, 2007, 12:33:11 am »
My Berner is now nearly 11 months old and is very laid back social with all dogs and lives with our cat very easily the cat has the upper hand.He can be aloof to strangers as long as he is allowed to approach them rather than the other way around he is fine sometimes he will make Friends others he will sniff and walk away from.If they have a dog with them he will be their Friend for life.Where we walk we meet all sorts of people with different size dogs and no-one minds Ollie playing with their dogs however small as he is very gentle,he has also made Friends with an Airedale who is aggressive to other  males and has to stay on the leash his owner was amazed.
I must say he has chewed quite a bit and was very mouthy until a few weeks ago and harder to house train than my previous dog but on the whole a very easy puppy and is content to have his walk then laze around.Remembe r you must apply the 5 minutes to their age in months for at least 18 months as their joints are very sensitive as far as exercise goes.
Good luck with your search try to meet both parents we did and he is turning out to have their wonderful temperament.