Author Topic: Limping -help!  (Read 2843 times)

Offline April and Triton

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Limping -help!
« on: February 02, 2009, 04:27:02 pm »
Hello everyone! It has been awhile since I have posted.. but I need some advice. I am going a bit nuts here. Triton started favoring his right shoulder at 9 months old.. I waited a couple weeks thinking that it may be an injury and when it didn't get better went to the vet. He examined and thinks it is his right shoulder and gave me pain meds to give to see if it would heal on its own. Well, 1 pill to go and it is getting worse. Triton is now 10 months old. The vet is going to x-ray the hsoulder on the 17th when Triton goes i nto get neutered. Since the vet saw him he started doing this odd thing - when he is sitting and baring weight on his right paw this shoulder will wort of "give out" for a second then correct. I watched a video of it on slow motion and it almost seems that his shoulder is quickly rolling out and back in the joint. Anyone have experience with this? Any ideas ? The wait to the 17th is killing me.. I hope this isn't something serious. If he walks for any length of time the limp gets worse and worse. So have been taking it easy. Advice?? Please???
« Last Edit: February 02, 2009, 07:00:01 pm by April and Triton »

lins_saving_grace

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Re: Limping -help!
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2009, 04:52:19 pm »
what about his shoulder did the vet think it was?   is it possible Triton just popped it out of socket?

Offline sc.trojans

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Re: Limping -help!
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2009, 05:34:53 pm »

Given what you describe, he could have medial shoulder laxity:

http://www.vetsportsmedicine.com/resourceCenter/documents/VOSMNwstrFallFINAL11.20.08.pdf

But OCD of the shoulder should also be ruled out, especially given his age

You need to go to an orthopedic specialist for a valid diagnosis.  A shoulder abduction test can be done by a qualified orthopedist, but your regular vet will not be equipped (and has not been schooled in this or other diagnostic measures).  X-rays could reveal OCD, but wont detect medial instability.  If the shoulder abduction test is not conclusive, then an MRI is usually the only other definitive tool.

The OFA (panel of radiologists) grades shoulders and the shoulder joint and this is a good route to go for the cost, relative to a lot of testing by local practioners - you get a 3 panel assessment (3 opinions) for the cost and so its a good deal.
SC Trojans
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