Author Topic: Finding a boyfriend for my english mastiff  (Read 23864 times)

BabsT

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Re: Finding a boyfriend for my english mastiff
« Reply #15 on: August 18, 2005, 02:35:50 pm »
A fixed dog still has the desire to breed, it just cant. 

These are from the latest issue of Veterinary Practice News (Aug 2005).

We are mostly aware that spaying a bitch before her first season halves her risk of mammary cancer, and obviously castration frees you from concerns about testicular cancer, which is particularly worrisome in boys with retained testicles, but what about other cancers? Here are some figures that may surprise you.

Spayed bitches had four times the incidence of cardiac hemangiosarcom as compared to intact bitches. Neutered males have a significantly greater risk for these tumors compared to their intact brethren.

Prostate cancer is four times more common in castrated dogs compared to intact ones.

Neutered and spayed dogs have up to 3 times the likelihood of developing bladder cancer compared to intact ones, and are twice as likely to develop osteosarcoma (bone cancer). Males are four times more likely to die within 2 years of diagnosis when compared with females. Dogs neutered or spayed before they were a year old had a one in four lifetime risk of getting osteosarcoma.

Ultimately, with the unfolding of the canine genome, we may know which cancers our dogs are most likely to get, and be able to say whether an individual is better intact or neutered, in the meantime, as with most questions, the answer to whether spaying or neutering is better from a health point of view is "it depends."

GYPSY JAZMINE

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Re: Finding a boyfriend for my english mastiff
« Reply #16 on: August 18, 2005, 02:48:37 pm »
A fixed dog still has the desire to breed, it just cant. 

These are from the latest issue of Veterinary Practice News (Aug 2005).

We are mostly aware that spaying a bitch before her first season halves her risk of mammary cancer, and obviously castration frees you from concerns about testicular cancer, which is particularly worrisome in boys with retained testicles, but what about other cancers? Here are some figures that may surprise you.

Spayed bitches had four times the incidence of cardiac hemangiosarcom as compared to intact bitches. Neutered males have a significantly greater risk for these tumors compared to their intact brethren.

Prostate cancer is four times more common in castrated dogs compared to intact ones.

Neutered and spayed dogs have up to 3 times the likelihood of developing bladder cancer compared to intact ones, and are twice as likely to develop osteosarcoma (bone cancer). Males are four times more likely to die within 2 years of diagnosis when compared with females. Dogs neutered or spayed before they were a year old had a one in four lifetime risk of getting osteosarcoma.

Ultimately, with the unfolding of the canine genome, we may know which cancers our dogs are most likely to get, and be able to say whether an individual is better intact or neutered, in the meantime, as with most questions, the answer to whether spaying or neutering is better from a health point of view is "it depends."
Babs, I am not being argumentative at all here when I ask what does altering have to do with bone cancer in dogs?...I really don't understand...W ill you please explain?...Ty! :)

Offline RedyreRottweilers

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Re: Finding a boyfriend for my english mastiff
« Reply #17 on: August 19, 2005, 09:54:23 am »
A fixed dog still has the desire to breed, it just cant. 

Occasionally yes, but not often.

Most neutered males completely forget about breeding once their testosterone levels die down.

This is from my own personal experience with neutered males, both those neutered early, and as veterans.

Quote
These are from the latest issue of Veterinary Practice News (Aug 2005).

We are mostly aware that spaying a bitch before her first season halves her risk of mammary cancer, and obviously castration frees you from concerns about testicular cancer, which is particularly worrisome in boys with retained testicles, but what about other cancers? Here are some figures that may surprise you.

Spayed bitches had four times the incidence of cardiac hemangiosarcom as compared to intact bitches. Neutered males have a significantly greater risk for these tumors compared to their intact brethren.

Prostate cancer is four times more common in castrated dogs compared to intact ones.

Neutered and spayed dogs have up to 3 times the likelihood of developing bladder cancer compared to intact ones, and are twice as likely to develop osteosarcoma (bone cancer). Males are four times more likely to die within 2 years of diagnosis when compared with females. Dogs neutered or spayed before they were a year old had a one in four lifetime risk of getting osteosarcoma.

And my personal bitch, who was spayed after 3 years of age, died of osteosarcoma. Hopefully as time goes by we are able to collect even more data on why this terrible disease happens.

Quote
Ultimately, with the unfolding of the canine genome, we may know which cancers our dogs are most likely to get, and be able to say whether an individual is better intact or neutered, in the meantime, as with most questions, the answer to whether spaying or neutering is better from a health point of view is "it depends."

One other thing that you must touch on when discussing this subject is the possibility of the death of the bitch from whelping complications.

This can and does happen. I don't have stats, but any time you breed a bitch, you stand the chance of losing her.

For me, spay/neuter of animals that are not to be used for breeding or shown in the ring is the order of the day.

I require all my pet puppies to be S/N, and fairly early.

Control of indiscriminate breeding of dogs I breed is paramount to me.

Health is of great concern as well, but I will not tolerate the breeding of any dogs that come from me unless they meet certain criteria.

:D
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Offline newflvr

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Re: Finding a boyfriend for my english mastiff
« Reply #18 on: August 19, 2005, 10:01:50 am »
This is so interesting because I'm trying to decide what the right thing to do with Chester (6 month old Newf).  The breeder wants me to wait until he's 24 months to neuter him so he'll get his full development in and he would also like to have him shown.  Is there a risk of waiting until he's that old to put him under?  I understand that Newfs have a slower metabolism so surgery is more dangerous for them if the vet isn't familiar with the breed.  How guilty should I feel if I decide to neuter earlier than the 24 months?  I really don't want to breed him (even though he's perfect....so far).  I just don't know anything about breeding and feel it should be left to those that do!

GYPSY JAZMINE

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Re: Finding a boyfriend for my english mastiff
« Reply #19 on: August 19, 2005, 10:07:08 am »
This is so interesting because I'm trying to decide what the right thing to do with Chester (6 month old Newf).  The breeder wants me to wait until he's 24 months to neuter him so he'll get his full development in and he would also like to have him shown.  Is there a risk of waiting until he's that old to put him under?  I understand that Newfs have a slower metabolism so surgery is more dangerous for them if the vet isn't familiar with the breed.  How guilty should I feel if I decide to neuter earlier than the 24 months?  I really don't want to breed him (even though he's perfect....so far).  I just don't know anything about breeding and feel it should be left to those that do!
That's the same reason
  am having Pippin fixed...I could have bred or showed him but I just want a furry "little" friend to snuggle with! :D

BabsT

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Re: Finding a boyfriend for my english mastiff
« Reply #20 on: August 19, 2005, 10:15:38 am »
I think for all breeds waiting until a dog is mature is better for spaying or neutering...Re moving sex hormones and sex organs before maturity just doesnt seem right to me...that is my honest opinion.  Zero if he is neutered wont be until he is atleast 2 or 3 otherwise

In regards to not having non breeding stock bred, just make them infertile with a vestecomy like you would do a man and he can stay intact...I do know of one breeder that does that

Spaying and neutering seems to be an american thing....peopl e i know overseas find it odd that we are so for spaying and neutering

Offline Kermit

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Re: Finding a boyfriend for my english mastiff
« Reply #21 on: August 19, 2005, 10:25:08 am »
Do they have as bad a problem with dog overpopulation overseas?

Offline Nina

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Re: Finding a boyfriend for my english mastiff
« Reply #22 on: August 19, 2005, 10:25:08 am »
Babs, do they have a pet over population in Europe? Just wondering if that is why they don't do it as often there? I love hearing about other cultures and there views. Like how in france they don't stock pile food like we do, they shop everyday. Their fridges are very small , enough to hold milk butter.... This is very interesting to me, I'd love to hear their view on animals.
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BabsT

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Re: Finding a boyfriend for my english mastiff
« Reply #23 on: August 19, 2005, 10:45:54 am »
I do have some friends originally from europe and I talk to a lot of people from different countries on message boards...you know the ones you become good online friends with

DOnt get me wrong, I am not against spaying and neutering...I just dont think it is right for me.  When my friends mom brought her puppy over from Poland and wernt spaying I said how come...SSHe replied because there is not needed.  All you american obsessed with spaying and neutering.  In my country people dont do all this stuff LOL

My other friend from portugal said the same thing...I dont know...I am for responsible dog ownership however the owner feels whats best

Offline Nina

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Re: Finding a boyfriend for my english mastiff
« Reply #24 on: August 19, 2005, 10:56:55 am »
Babs

For sure, do what is best for you animal!  ;D I have a friend that has a pug that is allergic to everything under the sun, including vaccines, her dog almost died when she had the first set of vaccines, so she doesn't get her vaccinated. Her pug is healty, she just doens't take her to dog parks or anything like that.
For me I spay and neuter my pets because it is right for me. But if someone chooses not to, I won't push my opinion on them  :)
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Harley(Lab mix)
Dilbert(Pyr mix)At the bridge
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ann

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Re: Finding a boyfriend for my english mastiff
« Reply #25 on: August 19, 2005, 12:07:07 pm »


 with our pet over population, i think its clear we are not spaying and neutering enough........ ..........chec k out the shelters and rescues :'(

Offline Nina

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Re: Finding a boyfriend for my english mastiff
« Reply #26 on: August 19, 2005, 12:16:31 pm »
I do agree that there is a huge pet over population. But I also think that if people choose to not spay/neuter they also need to be responsilbe in keeping females inside and keep males in check and not let them run loose. It is the irresponsilbe pet owners that are causing this problem! As the pets end up in shelters from neglect and letting them run loose ect.

All my pets are S/N as I don't want to deal with heat cycles and marking.  ;D



Nina
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Offline RedyreRottweilers

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Re: Finding a boyfriend for my english mastiff
« Reply #27 on: August 19, 2005, 12:20:11 pm »

Just one more thing to mention, and that is Pyometritis in bitches.

Intact bitches will almost always eventually come down with this gross inflammation and infection of the uterus. If not immediately and aggressively treated with surgical removal of the putrid uterus, the bitch will die.

Sometimes WITH aggressive surgical intervention, bitches die.

I do not leave ANY bitches intact after the age of 8 years of age, and I really prefer them spayed by age 7 if possible.

Just one more piece of the puzzle to consider.

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Offline greek4

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Re: Finding a boyfriend for my english mastiff
« Reply #28 on: August 19, 2005, 12:22:11 pm »
A friend of mine breeds goldens.
When her female was 1, she was in heat.  She was in the house and they were being really careful not to let her out, etc.

Well, a chocolate lab came through their front window and bred her while they were gone.  I guess that shows you can't stop a male on a mission.

I have also heard that dogs can breed through fences.  I nueter for health and temperment reasons.  But this is another to everyone their own.  I wouldn't expect any one to give sympathy to the owner who knowingly has an unneutered animal whose animal accidently got pregnant or impregnated another. 

I understand situations like our very own BPO doberman pregnancy going on right now.  But knowingly maintaining an unneutered animal puts a lot of responsible on the owner,  The owner has to be responsible for things beyond their control.
Thanks,

Emily and 1 husband, 1 boy, 1 on the way, and 4 crazy dogs

Offline RedyreRottweilers

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Re: Finding a boyfriend for my english mastiff
« Reply #29 on: August 19, 2005, 12:24:35 pm »

Boy you betcha it takes some careful supervision.

My puppy is in season right now.

She is out in my 6 foot tall VERY well fenced yard ONLY under my direct supervision.

Otherwise, she is in the house with me.

If I leave, she either goes with me in her crate in the van, or she stays INSIDE my house, crated.

I almost never take my eyes off a bitch in season unless I know she is behind closed doors and crated.

Period.

;)
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